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Love and Equality

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Love and Equality

Yesterday I sat down and started drafting a celebratory blog about the election of the first female American President, in anticipation of Hillary Clinton’s inevitable victory. How could anything else be possible? It was unfathomable to me that the people of America could elect a man so profoundly unqualified, and so blatantly racist, misogynistic and bigoted. A man with such disdain for democracy and decency. A man who was endorsed by the Klu Klux Klan.

As a new day dawns, I feel, as I’m sure many do, deeply sad and uncertain about the future....

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The other side of the story

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The other side of the story

You may have seen me post some enviable photos of our recent family holiday to Thailand and Myanmar. Sun shining, beautiful azure water, bare-bottomed kids playing in the sand. Paradise. And it was. Those photos are real. But just like everything else on social media, they only tell part of the story....

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Women of Speed: Life lesson from driving around a race track

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Women of Speed: Life lesson from driving around a race track

Dark clouds rolled over Sydney Motorsport Park and a mix of excitement and mild terror hung in the air. In the Audi corporate suite, nearly 20 Women of Style winners, judges, brand ambassadors and organisers gathered for the Audi InStyleAudi Drive Day. I grabbed another cheese and tomato croissant, a fresh café latte and settled into one of the white leather chairs, wondering what we were in for. Read my article in Audi Magazine below about the unexpected life lessons that I learned speeding around a race track...

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Let's climb down from the pedestal this Mother's Day

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Let's climb down from the pedestal this Mother's Day

The other day I was driving home from my office engrossed in the podcast, “Magic Lessons”, when the road became distorted through my tears and I had to pull the car over.  Elizabeth Gilbert was speaking with a young mother who had a desire to write a book, but had been blocked in part by the guilt that somehow pursuing her own dreams meant failing her children. By way of encouragement Liz Gilbert shared a quote from A.S. Byatt, one of my favourite authors. It said: “I think of my writing simply in terms of pleasure. It’s the most important thing in my life: making things. Much as I love my husband and children, I love them only because I am the person who makes things.  I, who I am, is the person who has the project of making a thing ... And because that person does that all the time, that person is able to love all those other people.” These fearless words touched a deep truth I had felt but never been brave enough to say...

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A letter to my son

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A letter to my son

On Monday my eldest son turned 5. In some ways it is hard to believe that 5 years have past since he came into this world; a beautiful, slimy creature, peeing on arrival. In other ways it feels like a lifetime, and he has been in our lives forever.  

When he turned one, I wrote him a letter reflecting on all that he had taught me in his first year of life. Today I thought I'd share this letter with you because four years on, and with two more beautiful children, I feel like I have been learning the same five lessons over and over again...

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Survival parenting 101

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Survival parenting 101

I haven’t written a blog in quite a while. I’ve been sick with the flu. That combined with all that goes with having three kids and running my own business, it has been hard to find the time to write. Well, it’s more than that really. I have sat down to blog a few times, and managed a few lame sentences, maybe even a paragraph, but it never led anywhere...

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We can't wait 117 years for gender parity!

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We can't wait 117 years for gender parity!

I am always surprised that many young women (and men) don’t personally identify as feminists. To be a feminist is to believe that men and women, boys and girls, should have the same rights and opportunities, and be treated with the same dignity and respect. That seems like something we should all be able to get behind... 

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100 days of loving life and the lessons I learned

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100 days of loving life and the lessons I learned

A little over 100 days ago I started a personal project. It was soon after the Paris bombings and the news and my social media feed was filled with tragedy. Anger and hate seemed to be rising up within the public consciousness, and virtually emanating from my computer screen.

I strongly believe that what we focus on expands. And I felt that if we continued to focus on what divides us, we would only see an escalation of animosity. So I decided instead to concentrate my energies on love and the beauty of life. It was a small gesture...

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What do you believe?

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What do you believe?

Belief seems to be a recurring theme in my life at the moment. I am immersed in writing a book about the search for one's true beliefs. I have been doing a meditation series related to how our beliefs - the most intimate and deeply held ideas we have about ourselves, others and the world - filter our everyday experiences, even if we don’t realise it. And last week in the lead up to a business coaching session with OfKin I was asked to write a list of 50 things that I believe. In a virtual stream of consciousness this is what I wrote...

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Post-baby body blah

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Post-baby body blah

I wrote this poem after I woke up one morning, looked at myself in the mirror and seriously questioned whether I should get Botox. And then I seriously questioned my own mental state for even considering it. And then I thought, WTF, why am I wasting so much time and energy worrying about how I look. And then I wondered, well if I am occasionally fixated on these fine lines on my forehead, how many other millions of women (and men) are obsessing about body image? And then I speculated that if we weren’t worrying about our bodies all the time, that surplus energy could power the whole planet. So then I asked myself, how do we get out of this self-critical cycle of insanity?  

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Holding my grandmother's hand

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Holding my grandmother's hand

I was making pancakes for my three kids this morning, a weekend tradition, when my father called with the news that my grandmother had passed away last night. I wanted to press pause on life for a moment to mourn. But life did not stop. “When will the pancakes be ready, when, when, when?” demanded Felix. “Cuddle, cuddle, I want up”, said Otis. Smoke started to rise in the kitchen as the pancakes burned. So I went back to cooking as tears ran down my cheeks. And after the children had their breakfast fill, I went to my room and took a few moments to reflect...

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7 steps to making New Year's resolutions come true

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7 steps to making New Year's resolutions come true

Its my birthday today. Having a birthday on New Year’s Eve has its pros and cons. There is always a party on, but rarely is anyone available for a birthday celebration, and all the restaurants are inevitably booked out. Still, I would never swap my birthday for any other day. You see, I love that the years of my life align with the calendar years. It feels orderly, which appeals to my Capricorn control-freak tendencies, but most importantly, it enables my cherished birthday tradition...

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Saving the world in Jimmy Choos

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Saving the world in Jimmy Choos

I have an obsession with beautiful things. Beautiful furnishings, beautiful food, beautiful dresses, beautiful music, beautiful photographs and definitely beautiful shoes. And from a very early age I have been passionate about making the world a better place, somehow. That may sound kind of self-important or naïve, but for as long as I can remember social justice has been a driving force in my life. Whether it was collecting coins for charity when I was six, reading books for the MS Read-a-thon, volunteering at Amnesty International and refugee organisations, or working to prevent violence against women. It is all I’ve ever wanted to do.  These two parts of myself have always seemed dichotomous and contradictory...

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My first poem

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My first poem

I started writing poetry recently. I'm not really sure why. I've always enjoyed reading poetry, but never tried writing it. Poetry seemed so literary, unattainable, something that required dedicated study. However, I have kept a journal ever since I can remember, and I write in it almost every day. It is inexpensive therapy, a way to process my thoughts and feelings. The writing is not meant to be seen, it is just a stream of consciousness. But it serves to get thoughts out of my head, and quieten my mind.One morning a few weeks ago when I felt particularly overwhelmed, I sat down to write my usual scribble, but...

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Emojionally awkward

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Emojionally awkward

One of my close friends recently told me that I “text like a guy”. This is probably an unfair gender stereotype but her point was that my text messages are blunt and, without any emojis, emotionless. She said that my text messages often make her wonder if I’m pissed. Probably because I always sign off with 😤 😾.

No, (JK) in truth I was very surprised. I never meant to convey that message....

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#ILoveLife

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#ILoveLife

“I love life and life loves me.” I can’t remember where I first heard this but it has become my favourite mantra. It’s not what I say while I’m meditating as such, but something I say to myself regularly while I’m driving kids somewhere, inevitably late, or wiping up smeared yoghurt from the floor, or looking out my office window as I reply to emails. 

I know it’s a little corny, ok a lot corny. And you may think I’m bordering on certifiable talking to myself like this. But the truth is...

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The bravest thing I've ever done

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The bravest thing I've ever done

Quitting my job at the peak of my international career and moving back to Melbourne is the bravest thing I have ever done. It might not sound like a big deal. In fact, when I spoke to my father about it he suggested that surely moving with three children under three to South Africa, where we didn’t know anyone, to take up a demanding new job, was more courageous. “No,” I explained; “that was normal.” That was my regular life, the pattern I had pursed for years. Yes, it had its challenges but it wasn’t courageous because I wasn’t afraid of doing that. You see, courage, according to the Oxford English dictionary, is the ability to do something that frightens one...

 

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